I'll Show You Mine if You Show Me Yours

I rarely watch television anymore. It wasn't in small part because of how unimpressed I am up with the writing quality of many of the series; another is that the series that I do like always get cancelled. But a third is how so many of the series seem to be overly feministic: the woman is strong and overcoming, while the guy, if there is any, is either a stupid ass that is lucky to be the woman's object of interest or a completely fictitious blue prince that the woman drools over but everybody knows doesn't exist.

Unfortunately, I don't know if the pseudo-reality in television has spilled over to society or the other way around, as in most metropolitan areas in USA and Mexico the man is know pushed aside. The reasons vary: we are the ones that start wars, we are the perverted ones, we,men, are the problem. Thus, we need to sit in the back of the Metrobus while the woman can sit anywhere she wants; there are laws specifically to protect and enhance the woman's life where she is repeatedly confronted by the harshness of the male presence. Children can't sit alone with an adult man in an airplane flight, bathrooms are "woman exclusive", and a woman can cut in line with no problems and any justified verbal retaliation coming from a man is frowned upon.

I know history, I understand why this is so. But why am I being punished and stereotyped for the wrongdoing of a few? Yes, a few. Stating that "all men are alike" implies that you know, intimately, a large enough random sample of the male population, at least a 20%. Do you want to do the math? When one instrument is de-tuned, the whole orchestra sounds bad, but it doesn't mean all of them are lousy musicians.

I understand, as I've stated, the grounds for the feminist movement. However, their main goal of empowering women by these methods does not only feels petty but is counterproductive. A strong woman (or person for that matter) would scoff at the fact of "being protected", as it entails a privilege over other people that is unjust and degrades their dignity as a human being. We are all equally important in society and the law should treat us that way; no extra credit should be given just for having a vagina or a penis.

Our physiologies are different but our roles are potentially the same. When a child is born, everybody involved goes through it, some physically, others psychologically, anothers economically. Each challenge has its virtues and shouldn't be dismissed as inferior. The same goes for raising a child, household and workplace roles, and all their moral and ethical implications. These aren't sex-specific, why do they feel that way everywhere I go?

Tell you what, I'll show you mine if you show me yours. I enjoy the sight of any of the possibilities, I hope you do too.


EDIT (2010-07-20): From reader comments and various re-readings, I've noticed that this post was published without the care of explaining myself that I like to have in my posts. I apologize. For amends, I present to you a reply I made to one of my favorite readers in the comment section that I think clarifies this post a bit more:

My intent here is to point out how society is beginning to lean on a legal overprotection of women by denigrating the social status of men, instead of making clear the sexual equality under the current law.

To do this, arguments of historical sexual deviance are thrown. In this is what I meant by "few", which they are in the bigger scope, as few men are convicted of rape compared to the total male population. Keyword being "convicted", as far more women are found innocent in rape crimes than men and it isn't considered discrimination, while it clearly is.

If a job isn't given to a woman, sexism is always suspected and even sometimes used as leverage. If a man even hints at touching a woman, charges can easily proceed. In all the examples I've mentioned (in the post and this comment), turn the roles around and ponder about the different outcome. It's a social/cultural thing (I'm not pinpointing women per se) and its acceptance was driven by misguided guilt, misplaced blame, and ignorant pride.

As for misogyny, if I were a woman, I would hesitate bringing it up, since "more than a few" are guilty of misandry. Discrimination goes both ways, and it only worsens with more acts of discrimination.



4 comments:

ngo said...

Mmm... like you said not all men are like that, but not all women are like that. I find that as a women, leaving in a city like Mexico city toughens you up. There are a lot of perverts out there. As a women you need to earn mens respect without letting them be condescending to you. I suppose a lot of girls toughen up differently. I learned that with hard work and proving to them and me that I can do it by myself. Others, well, just abuse their powers.

Nice hearing from you again.

Carmen said...

A few? I don't believe misogynous men are only "a few", and no, you don't need to know "intimately" a person to realize it. I say person, because a lot of women are also misogynous. We all are to blame for this gender/sex problem.

Women have always had a strong role in society, but now it's more evident, less underground. We can express and act openly, let's be sure we don't abuse the power we are obtaining.

I agree with the last part, about the potential equity of humans, regardless sex, ethnic group, nationality, etc...

balkce said...

My intent here is to point out how society is beginning to lean on a legal overprotection of women by denigrating the social status of men, instead of making clear the sexual equality under the current law. 

To do this, arguments of historical sexual deviance are thrown. In this is what I meant by "few", which they are in the bigger scope, as few men are convicted of rape compared to the total male population. Keyword being "convicted", as far more women are found innocent in rape crimes than men and it isn't considered discrimination, while it clearly is. 

If a job isn't given to a woman, sexism is always suspected and even sometimes used as leverage. If a man even hints at touching a woman, charges can easily proceed. In all the examples I've mentioned (in the post and this comment), turn the roles around and ponder about the different outcome. It's a social/cultural thing (I'm not pinpointing women per se) and its acceptance was driven by misguided guilt, misplaced blame, and ignorant pride. 

As for misogyny, if I were a woman, I would hesitate bringing it up, since "more than a few" are guilty of misandry. Discrimination goes both ways, and it only worsens with more acts of discrimination. 

ngo said...

:)